Area Guide

Claverdon

About Claverdon

Claverdon is a village and civil parish in the Stratford district of Warwickshire, England, about 5 miles (8.0 km) west of the county town of Warwick.

Claverdon's toponym comes from the Old English for "clover hill". The hill is near the centre of the scattered parish which includes the township of Langley to the south, and formerly comprised the manors of Claverdon, Langley, Kington (to the south-west), and Songar (in the south-east). There are hamlets near the church and at Yarningale, Kington, Lye Green, and Gannaway; and there is also a group of houses near the school.[4] It includes modern development along with historic buildings: the forge; The Stone Building; St Michael's Church; and 16th and 17th century half-timbered cottages.

The Manor of Claverdon is recorded in the Domesday Book as part of the lands of the Count of Meulan, Robert of Beaumont who had inherited Meulan through his mother. It states; "In Ferncombe Hundred, (Clavendone) Claverdon, Bovi held it; he was a free man. 3 hides. Land for 5 ploughs. In lordship 1. 12 villages with a priest and 14 smallholders have 5 ploughs. 3 slaves. Meadow, 16 acres; woodland, 1 league; when exploited, value 10s. The value was 40s; now £4." The estate passed to the Earls of Warwick when Robert's brother, Henry, keeper of Warwick Castle since 1068, was created Earl of Warwick soon after 1086 and was granted Robert's Warwickshire lands, shortly after supplemented again by those of Thorkell of Arden.

It was forfeited in 1397 by Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick, for treason and granted, to Thomas, Earl of Kent, but restored to the Earl on the accession of Henry IV. In 1487 it came to the Crown and passed through various hands, being leased in 1517 for 21 years to Thomas Sherwyn, and its demesnes to Roger Walford, In, December 1547, the lordship was granted to John Dudley, Earl of Warwick, after whose execution the manor, in June 1554, was assigned to his widow Joan for life. Ambrose Dudley, fourth son of the Duke of Northumberland, was created Earl of Warwick in 1561 and received the Warwick estates, including the manor of Claverdon, which he sold in 1568 to Sir John Spencer, a member of a branch of the Spencer family, from whom Diana Princess of Wales was descended. They remained Lords of the Manor until 1716.

 

Sir John died 8 November 1586, having settled the manor on his second son Thomas, who died in 1630 and Claverdon passed, to his great-nephew Sir William Spencer of Yarnton, Oxfordshire, Baronet. Sir William in 1635 married Constance daughter of Sir Thomas Lucy and Alice Lucy (née Spencer) of Charlecote Park,[8] and dying in 1647 was succeeded by his son Sir Thomas Spencer, Baronet, M.P. Sir Thomas died on 6 March 1685 at the age of 46 years without surviving male issue, his widow Jane survived till 20 April 1712 as lady of the manor, but after her death the manor was sold about the year 1716 by the four surviving daughters, to Andrew Archer of Tanworth. Upon the death of Andrew Archer in 1741 the larger portion of his estate including the manor of Claverdon and the chief farms therein known as Park, Lodge, Breach, Gannaway, and the Reddings descended to his eldest son Thomas, created first Baron Archer of Umberslade in 1747.

Source: Wikipedia

The data used is based on the CV35 8 Postcode District. Some roads of Claverdon may lie in other postcode districts as other areas may reside in this postcode sector.

Due to the small sample size, the data can become compromised due to fluctuating transaction levels or unusual transactions. As such, the data provided is for guidance only and must not be relied upon.